Jerk

Truism Twenty-Five:  Don’t be a jerk.

First, I need to say:  There may not be as many jerks in the US, maybe elsewhere, as I think there are, and it is true that past times always seem better than they really were.  There seems to be a growing mindset that the self is far more important than anyone else that might stand in a person’s way and that if a person wants something, or does want something, everyone else should get out of the way while the person takes it or throws it away.

You are not more important than me, and I am not more important than anyone.

You have the ability to lose your jerkiness.  Think of others.  Think of consequences.  Think of the growing number of jerks in this world who don’t give rat’s ass about you.  Don’t throw the F-bomb in every sentence.  Don’t shoot the bird.  Don’t cut people off on the interstate or in parking lots or in line at the subway.

While you have the ability to change your jerkiness, you are not the cause entirely.  You should have learned discipline from your families.  They should not have taught you better.  They should not have yelled curse words at you when you did something wrong.  They should have taken something away that you wanted, and when you sulked about it, they should have put you in time-outs.  They should have reinforced good behavior.  They should have commended you, complimented you and validated you.  It should not have been OK to leave food on your plate at dinner, instead of giving you a snack to shut you up two hours later.  You should not have been allowed to use the Internet until your chores were done, and you should have had chores to do.  It should have been fun to play outside, more fun than on video games, and your parents should have been out there playing with you instead of griping about how much work they have to do.

Again, you do not have to be a jerk, but if you are one, drop it.  All of the other jerks will have you for dinner, though I doubt if they clean their plates.

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